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Acclaim

Over a thousand concertgoers gathered Sunday evening to hear the Delaware Symphony Orchestra (DSO) play Longwood Gardens. In a change from their not-every-summer policy, the renowned Kennett Square horticultural mecca presented this fine regional orchestra in its second successful summer outing.

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Gail Obenreder, Broad Street Review

Ancient Greek philosopher/scientist Aristotle first coined the phrase, “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” Atlantic Classical Orchestra’s Maestro David Amado recently established the validity of that statement. The Atlantic Classical Orchestra’s Masterworks Series Program I, called "Ode to Love - Ode to Joy" resulted in rousing standing ovations to sold-out audiences across the Treasure Coast and the Palm Beaches ...

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MaryAnn Ketcham, TC Palm

Amado led the orchestra in a fleet and polished performance that had the audience smiling.

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Gail Obenreder, Delaware Online

An article by Maestro Amado that delves deeply into the phenomenon of the cell phone in the concert hall. 

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David Amado, Delaware Online

It was conductor David Amado’s turn for an audition, and the seasoned maestro, longtime leader of the Delaware Symphony, compiled a terrific program. Music of Bernard Herrmann, Mozart and Berlioz filled the bill, and for the most part the maestro had the orchestra playing alertly and with passion.

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Keith Powers, South Coast Today

Under Maestro Amado, the DSO has become a strong, supple orchestra able to balance classic repertoire with forays into contemporary works.

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Gail Obenreder, Broad Street Review

The decision to perform this massive work was proof of the mature partnership Amado has forged with the orchestra. He knows their capabilities and they know what he wants and they deliver in extraordinary fashion.

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Christine Facciolo, Newsworks

An article by Maestro Amado that gives a brief overview of the Delaware Symphony Orchestra's 2015-16 season, before focusing on their May 6 performance of Shostakovich's 11th Symphony. 

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David Amado, Delaware Online

It is clear that after years of working together, Maestro Amado and his orchestra have created a musical synergy that is well worth hearing.

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Margaret Darby, Broad Street Review

For this outing, Maestro Amado chose an 1886 revision orchestrated by Mussorgsky’s friend Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. The work is filled with wild shifts in tempo and mood that demand attention to its dramatic details, and the orchestra fulfilled every twist and turn... The work opens frenetically, and Amado led the orchestra in a vibrant and spirited performance evoking a kind of abandon and manic glee.

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Gail Obenreder, Delaware Online

This truly iconic work poses a challenge to any conductor: Do you play the music and let the story take care of itself, or do you help it along? Amado’s reading is absolutely on the right side of sentimentality. His interpretation bristled with desire and intention. The first movement was playful and flirtatious. The ball waltzed itself into sheer delirium. As the music turned dark, Amado followed suit: the rhythms were unyielding; the mocking of Berlioz’s hero filled with spite. He kept the momentum going beyond the March to the Scaffold. The Witches’ Sabbath with its growly brass and tense strings sustained the nightmare to the very end. And let’s not forget the punctuation of the requiem Dies Irae by The Bells of Remembrance, which are featured in each concert of the DSO’s Classics Series this season.

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Christine Facciolo, Delaware Arts Info

Works for guitar and orchestra are not standard fare, so kudos all around – to Maestro David Amado for adventurous programming, to DSO musicians for rising to the evening’s musical challenges and to guest artists Brasil Guitar Duo, who played with charm and consummate musicality

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Gail Obenreder, Delaware Online

In this work that he obviously admires and understands intimately, Amado led the ensemble with precision, authority, effervescence and a clear hand. There was not a ragged or uncertain moment in a piece that could have descended into cacophony. Though Schoenberg’s Kammersymphonie (as the work is known) is a masterpiece, it is seldom performed.

For some of the musicians and most of the audience, this was a first, and those who heard it or played it on Tuesday were fortunate to be part of such a strong, sure and well-received performance.

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Gail Obenreder, Delaware Online

All that made for a spectacular "Great Gate of Kiev." Whereas some come on too strong too early, Amado paced things perfectly, releasing the floodgates at just the right time. That, coupled with the chiming of one of the Bells of Remembrance, made for an unforgettable and hard-hitting finale as ever.

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Christine Facciolo, Newsworks

Undaunted by the concerto’s ever-changing dynamics and intricate structure, the triumvirate – Amado, Goodyear and the orchestra – communicated seamlessly and created a connection that was electric. Solo and orchestral passages arose and faded organically in an unceasing musical tide. And the soloist was so much in command of the work that several times he overtly acknowledged the audience and brought them into the musical circle.

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Gail Obenreder, Delaware Online

That flair was particularly successful in Schumann’ Symphony No. 2 in C Major. Amado believes that the key to a successful rendition of Schumann’s notoriously clotted orchestration is to play the music lightly, as if it were by Mozart. Throughout this fine performance the musicians were unanimously bright and alert, with delicate hands on the string bows, plus perky winds and gentle brass. 

Amado showed great skill in shaping Schumann’s complex writing. Phrases that tumble into each other were always clearly conveyed.

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David Bratman, SF Classical Voice

Amado guided the orchestra through a powerful, convincing performance with romantic brio. Schumann's contrapuntal writing in the opening movement was treated with sensitivity, the strings setting the pace for a magnificently animated, virtuosic affair. In contrast, warm melodies in the Adagio espressivo were never exaggerated and revealed just how sensitive this orchestra is, how capable of grace, dignity and beautiful colors. It was, indeed, a performance Cleve may well have delighted in.

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Elijah Ho, San Jose Mercury News

Musicologists often argue about what the work might have sounded like had Mozart lived to complete it, demonstrating what his pupil Franz Xaver Sussmayr did to make the work performable.

DSO Music Director David Amado took a different tack. In his pre-concert lecture, he maintained that whatever the weaknesses and differences in Sussmayr’s work, he did at least know Mozart and his version has endured for more than two centuries.

Whether by sheer artistry or the suggestive power of the occasion — I like to think a bit of both — the musicians and singers seemed at their best in the intimate sections of the Requiem.

 

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Christine Facciolo, Delaware Arts Info

The DSO’s assured performance, by turns raucous and delicate, made especially touching the Laconocrimosa, a meditation and deconstruction of music from the Lacrimosa of Mozart’s Requiem which Mr. Tsontikas, whose appearance was warmly applauded, described as the heart of the piece

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Thomas Leitch, Delaware Online

"...his masterful interpretation also reached deeply inward and majestically outward."

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Gail Obenreder, Delaware Online

Amado treated the score as if it were the composer's Concerto for Orchestra, showcasing solos by the cello, flute, clarinet, bassoon and percussion, and according special prominence to concertmaster David Southorn, who gave voice to the heroine.

The sound throughout was bold and brilliant, with due attention to a shimmering range of sonorities. If the conflict between hero and heroine never exactly sounded dramatic, Amado made a serious case for the suite as the greatest movie score ever.

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Thomas Leitch, Delaware Online: The News Journal

The Delaware Symphony Orchestra departed from their usual script in any number of ways Friday night ... Hindemith's "Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber" was presented in a wholly novel way ... Orff's setting of medieval poems in French, German, and Latin sounded strikingly modern, prefiguring in both its thematic and musical language contemporary rock and rap.

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Thomas Leitch, News Journal
The Delaware Symphony Orchestra, under the baton of Music Director David Amado, offered its followers a piquant mixture of old and new Friday evening in a program entitled “Classic Masters.” The orchestra was playing its first concert in the Performing Arts Center of Archmere Academy on Philadelphia Pike, well off the beaten path for most members of the audience. Read More...
Thomas Leitch, News Journal
The Delaware Symphony Orchestra opened its 2013-14 season Friday with a much-anticipated concert, "Classic Romance." After uncertainty about the orchestra’s future, the audience that warmly welcomed musicians and conductor David Amado to the stage of The Grand was delighted to hear this fine orchestra under their gifted conductor play with their accustomed finesse. Read More...
Gail Obenreder, Delaware Online
"Amado brought his obvious affection for the strange, seductive and uninhibited "Symphonie Fantastique" by Hector Berlioz, which rips through all the adhesions and constraints of formal classical music. The Mobile Symphony Orchestra performed it flawlessly."

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Thomas B. Harrison, Press Register
Guest conductor David Amado and violin soloist Elena Urioste make their Mobile debuts next weekend, and it promises to be a harmonic convergence in every sense of the term.
Maestro and virtuoso have worked together in the past, when Urioste performed the Tchaikovsky Concerto for the Delaware Symphony Orchestra in Wilmington, where Amado is in his eighth season as music director.
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Thomas B. Harrison, Press Register

"... the performance [of Schubert's 'Unfinished' Symphony] was immensely assured, with solid work from the clarinets and horns. Like Rachmaninov, Schubert is always lyrical, even at his most dramatic, and under Amado's unmannered direction, the orchestra sang."


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THOMAS LEITCH, Deleware Online
Although he had last conducted it [Jean Sibelius's Fifth Symphony] only three years ago, he has clearly been thinking about it in new ways. Instead of reveling in the composer's celebrated crags and mists, he made each phrase vibrate with purpose. Read More...
THOMAS LEITCH, Delaware Online

Amado's reading of the symphony appropriately sought to balance impetuosity and emotional sweep with balance and equipoise. Under his direction, the orchestral playing was transparent, taut and disciplined, with particularly fine work from the trumpets, the English horn and the percussion section, whose massive yet never overwhelming waves of sound marked its finest hour this season.

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Thomas Leitch, Delaware Online
It also happens to be the first Mahler symphony I fell in love with as a brooding teenager," Amado says. "It covers seemingly every possible emotional base -- from deep sorrow to unbridled elation, from laughter to tears, from consolation to desolation. Read More...
Betsy Price, Delaware Online
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